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Lecture examines American two-party system

October 12, 2012 | By | Comments More

Flagler College assistant professor Steve Voguit invites Historic City News readers to attend the next 2012 Community Lecture Series edition on October 23 when he presents his views on the American tradition of voting for Republicans or Democrats — with third party candidates often an afterthought.

Professor Voguit earned his M.Ed. and B.S. degrees from Millersville University of Pennsylvania. He also completed graduate coursework at the University of Florida, the University of South Florida and Texas State University.

“I have looked at presidential elections, congressional elections and gubernatorial elections between 1865 and 1900 — clearly America was voting for Democrats or Republicans,” Voguit told Historic City News reporters. “But, with nothing in the Constitution or federal laws discussing a two-party system, how did this become the political norm?”

Tickets are $5 per person. Active military personnel may attend at no charge. Lectures begin at 10:00 a.m. in the Flagler Room at Flagler College located at 74 King Street. Reservations are required. Space is limited. To watch a live stream of the lecture, visit http://ustream.tv/channel/community-lecture-series.

This promises to be a thought provoking presentation of a very timely idea; given the fact that the November 6 ballot includes twelve-pair of would-be president/vice-president candidate’s names plus a blank line to select one of six additional write-in candidates.

“I am intrigued by this tradition since the constitution does not require political parties at all,” Voguit said. “I’ll be attempting to show the solidifying of the two-party tradition and the domination of the Republicans and Democrats at the national level.”

Voguit said that he would also talk briefly about the political conditions between 1865 and 1900; for instance high voter turnout and very close elections.

Voguit’s lecture “United Nation, Divided Nation: Patterns in American Politics after the Civil War” is the second in this year’s lecture series focusing on defining moments in American history during the mid to late 1800s.

The lecture will last approximately one hour and will be followed by a coffee and pastry reception. For reservations or more information, call Holly Hill, Assistant Director of College Relations at (904) 819-6282.

© 2012, HISTORIC CITY NEWS. All rights reserved.

Category: Entertainment